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Save the Date – NLIHC Forum to Address Affordable Housing Landscape Post-Election

Posted November 10, 2016

NLIHC’s 2017 Housing Policy Forum in Washington, DC, April 2-4, 2017 will convene thought-leaders, policy experts, researchers, affordable housing practitioners, low income residents, and leaders from Capitol Hill and the new Administration to discuss the post-election landscape for affordable housing in America. The Forum will explore emerging challenges and opportunities given the leadership changes in Washington and the best strategies for achieving positive affordable housing policy solutions. For more information, go to www.nlihcforum.org, or call NLIHC at (202) 662-1530, or e-mail outreach@nlihc.org.

 



Vermont’s Rental Housing Affordability Gap Continues to Grow

Posted June 13, 2016

BURLINGTON, VT – In order to afford a modest, two-bedroom apartment at the Fair Market Rent in Vermont, renters need to earn $21.13 an hour, or $43,947 a year. This is Vermont’s 2016 Housing Wage, revealed in the annual Out of Reach report released late last month by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, a Washington, DC-based research and advocacy organization, and today by the Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition.

The Housing Wage is the hourly wage a family must earn, working 40 hours a week, 52 weeks a year, to be able to afford the rent and utilities for a safe and modest home in the private housing market (affordable means paying no more than 30% of income).  Every year, Out of Reach reports on the Housing Wage for all states, counties, and metropolitan areas in the country.

The report highlights the gap between what renters earn and what it costs to afford rent at fair market value.  With an estimated mean renter wage of $11.79 an hour, average Vermont renters are left $9.34 an hour short of what they need to earn to afford a decent place to live.  They can afford just $613 a month for rent and utilities while the average statewide Fair Market Rent for a two-bedroom apartment is $1,099.  Vermont has nearly 75,000 renter households.

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“This report shows exactly how hard it is for ordinary working Vermonters, for seniors, for people with disabilities and others living on fixed incomes to afford safe, stable housing,” said Erhard Mahnke, the Affordable Housing Coalition’s Coordinator.  “Vermonters have to earn more than twice the minimum wage for something that should be considered a basic human right, leaving them with little left over for other basic needs and just a step away from homelessness.”

Even though Vermont’s minimum wage has increased annually for the last several years year, it is not enough to pay for decent housing:  2.2 full-time jobs at minimum wage – or 88 work hours a week — are needed to afford the average two-bedroom apartment.  A full-time minimum wage worker in Vermont can only afford $499 a month for rent and utilities, leaving a gap of $600.

While some might consider this is an unfair comparison because they think most minimum wage workers are high school students, this is not the reality.  According to the latest data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average age of a minimum wage worker is 35 years old, and 88% are at least 20 years old.  Half are older than 30, and about a third are at least 40.

“Our chronic housing shortage and affordability gap make it harder for low-income and vulnerable Vermonters to find and retain housing,” said Ted Wimpey, Director of the Champlain Valley Office of Economic Opportunity’s statewide Fair Housing Program and Chairperson of the Affordable Housing Coalition.  “To make true and lasting headway against this shortage and towards the goal of ending homelessness, we need significant new state and federal investments in affordable housing, coupled with rental assistance for the lowest income families, and supportive services for those with the greatest challenges.”

Unfortunately, federal funding levels for housing, rental assistance and supportive services are far below what they were five or six years ago.  The state of Vermont suffers from chronic budget shortfalls, preventing it from making the needed investments.  Key federal programs like HOME and Community Development Block Grants have been underfunded for years.  Congress still has not seen fit to restore all the rental assistance vouchers lost through sequestration.   The State has shortchanged the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board, our primary tool for increasing the state’s affordable housing portfolio, for years.  It has been unable to make the necessary increases to such key housing safety net programs as the Vermont Rental Subsidy Program, which helps close the gap between what low-income Vermonters can afford and what’s available on the market.

Additional findings from Out of Reach:

  • The national Housing Wage is $20.30 in 2016.
  • Vermont is the state with the sixth largest shortfall between the two-bedroom housing wage and the renter wage.
  • Vermont is the seventh most expensive state for rural (non-metro) areas.
  • Vermont is the 13th most expensive state in the nation for renters.
  • The Housing Wage in the greater metropolitan area of Burlington is $26.08, almost $5.00 an hour higher than the state average.
  • The one-bedroom Housing Wage is $16.58 an hour ($34,479 a year), requiring 69 work hours a week at minimum wage to afford the monthly rent of $862.
  • Someone with a disability living on Supplemental Security Income (SSI) can only afford $236 a month, leaving them $863 short for a two-bedroom, and $626 short for a one-bedroom apartment.

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For additional information, visit: www.nlihc.org/oor/.

For a link to the full press release and supplemental materials, click here.

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The Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition is a statewide membership organization dedicated to ensuring that all Vermonters have decent, safe and affordable housing, particularly the state’s low and moderate-income residents, elders, people living with homelessness, and people with disabilities. For more information on the Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition, visit
www.vtaffordablehousing.org
.

The National Low Income Housing Coalition is dedicated solely to achieving socially just public policy that assures people with the lowest incomes in the United States have affordable and decent homes. For more information on the National Low Income Housing Coalition, visit www.nlihc.org

 



Annual Report Finds Vermont Rents Continue to Climb Out of Reach

Posted May 19, 2015

Burlington, VT – In order to afford a modest, two-bedroom apartment at the Fair Market Rent in Vermont, renters need to earn $20.68 per hour, or $43,017 a year. This is Vermont’s 2015 Housing Wage, revealed in a report released today. The report, Out of Reach 2015, was jointly released by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, a Washington, DC-based research and advocacy organization, and the Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition.

The Housing Wage is the hourly wage a family must earn, working 40 hours a week, 52 weeks a year, to be able to afford the rent and utilities for a safe and modest home in the private housing market.

“Rents in Vermont continue to rise every year, making it harder and harder for low wage, service sector workers and people living on fixed incomes to get by,” said Erhard Mahnke, Coordinator for the Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition. “With a Housing Wage of over $20 an hour for the first time, ordinary Vermonters must pay an ever-increasing portion of their income for rent, leaving little left for other basic necessities and often precipitating them into the downward spiral of homelessness.”

Even though Vermont’s minimum wage was increased last year, a family must have 2.3 wage earners working full-time at minimum wage, or one full-time earner working 90 hours a week, to afford a two-bedroom apartment at the average statewide Fair Market Rent of $1,075. A full-time minimum wage worker in Vermont can only afford $476 for rent and utilities, leaving a gap of just under $600 between what they can afford and the cost of the average two-bedroom apartment. While it is possible for a household to work more than one job to make ends meet, a 2011 Vermont study showed that 62% of the state’s households had only one, or less than one full-time worker.

“With rents going up steadily and a one percent vacancy rate statewide, it is not surprising that we are seeing increased homelessness, and for longer periods of time, especially among families with children,” said Sara Kobylenski, Executive Director of the Upper Valley Haven in White River Junction and Co-Chair of the Vermont Coalition to End Homelessness. “To make headway, we need more affordable homes, coupled with rental subsidies and supportive services for our lowest income Vermonters and those with special challenges.”

Greater investments in affordable housing and ending homelessness are needed at both the federal and state levels. Unfortunately, federal funding for housing, community development and rental assistance have suffered deep cuts over the last several years. Recent proposals in Congress are to eliminate funding for the National Housing Trust Fund – the first new federal housing program since the early 1990’s. Vermont’s own fiscal woes have resulted in cuts to the Vermont Housing Conservation Board for next year, while funding to alleviate homelessness has not seen the increases needed to make lasting progress, and the state’s safety net continues to fray further.

Additional Facts:

  • The national Housing Wage is $19.35 in 2015.
  • Vermont is the 13th most expensive state in the nation for renters (including DC).
  • Vermont is the ninth most expensive state for non-metropolitan/rural areas.
  • The Housing Wage is up 29% since the Great Recession began in 2008.
  • The Housing Wage in the greater metropolitan area of Burlington is $25.54, 24% higher than the state average.
  • A Vermont renter with a full-time job at the mean renter wage of $11.78 an hour can only afford $613 for rent and utilities, leaving them with an affordability gap of over $460 for a two-bedroom apartment.
  • Someone with a disability living on Supplemental Security Income (SSI) can only afford $236, leaving them $839 short for a two-bedroom, and $600 short for a one-bedroom apartment.

Every year, Out of Reach reports on the Housing Wage and other housing affordability data for every state, county, metropolitan area, and combined non-metropolitan area in the country. The report presents housing costs nationwide, highlighting the gap between what renters earn and what it costs to afford rent at fair market value. For additional information, visit: www.nlihc.org/oor/.

Click the images below to view larger image:

VTOOR
 

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To download the full press release and supplemental materials for Vermont click here.

 



Save the Date: 2015 NLIHC Housing Legislative Forum and Leadership Reception, March 1-3

Posted January 30, 2015

Register now for the 2015 National Low Income Housing Coalition Legislative Forum and Leadership Reception, which will be held on March 1st – 3rd at the Washington Court Hotel in Washington, D.C.

Join the National Low Income Housing Coalition and other affordable housing advocates from around the country as we engage with renowned thought and policy leaders to Educate, Advocate, Activate – NOW!

The 2015 NLIHC Housing Legislative Forum will be packed with dynamic, powerhouse presenters, speakers, and panelists — some of the best and brightest minds in the affordable housing sector.

To EDUCATE – Learn from the nation’s leading housing researchers on the link between housing and the human condition: Stephanie Ettinger De Cuba (Children’s HealthWatch), Matthew Desmond (Harvard University), and Ingrid Gould Ellen (Furman Center, NYU/Wagner School).

To ADVOCATE – Hear from our national partners on housing finance reform, the federal budget, tax reform, and regulatory changes needed in federal housing and homeless programs: Mark Calabria (Cato Institute), Nan Roman (National Alliance to End Homelessness), Barbara Sard (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities), Ali Solis (Enterprise Community Partners), and Joe Ventrone (National Association of Realtors).

To ACTIVATE – Discuss strategies with state housing coalition and resident leaders from around the country led by NLIHC Policy Committee Co-Chairs: Daisy Franklin, Public Housing Resident Network (CT), and Rachael Myers, Washington Low Income Housing Alliance (WA).

Other highlights of the Forum include keynote speakers The Honorable Julián Castro, Secretary, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Darren Walker, President of the Ford Foundation

We will be honoring Dr. William Apgar with the Cushing Niles Dolbeare Lifetime Service Award and OMB Director and Former HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan with the Edward W. Brooke Housing Leadership Award at our Housing Leadership Reception the evening of March 3.

For more information and details on how to register, click here. Early-bird registration has been extended to February 6.

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NLIHC Call to Action: Urge Congress to Replace Sequestration with a Balanced Approach to Deficit Reduction

Posted December 19, 2014

Sign on today to a letter urging lawmakers to act quickly to stop sequestration from taking effect in the upcoming fiscal year. Sequestration in FY16 would impose additional deep cuts to important nondefense discretionary (NDD) programs, including HUD and Rural Housing Service housing programs. Join advocates from around the country in calling on Congress to stop these cuts from going forward. Sign your organization on by COB on Monday, January 5.

BACKGROUND

In 2011, Congress passed the Budget Control Act, which resulted in 6% across-the-board cuts to housing and most other discretionary programs in 2013. Those cuts resulted in 100,000 fewer housing choice vouchers being in use in 2014, as well as cuts to every other HUD and Rural Housing Service program. The 2013 sequester had significant negative consequences on the availability and affordability of housing and it should not be repeated.

NLIHC continues to work with NDD United, a coalition representing a broad range of NDD programs, in addition to housing and community development, such as job training, public health, scientific research and national parks. It is important that this letter, organized by NDD United, include a large number of housing and community development organizations to express our sector’s serious concerns about another round of cuts in FY16.

The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 negotiated by Representative Paul Ryan (R-WI) and Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) provided partial, temporary relief from sequestration in FY14 and FY15. This relief expires at the end of FY15. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that if sequestration moves forward in FY16, NDD spending will drop to 3.3% of gross domestic product in 2015 and 3.1% in 2016.

WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT

NDD programs have already been cut disproportionately in recent years as lawmakers work to reduce the deficit, even though experts across the political spectrum agree these programs are not a driving factor behind our nation’s mid- and long-term fiscal challenges.

NDD programs cover a wide range of important services, including homelessness prevention, housing assistance, community development, education, job training, human services, public health, scientific and medical research, national parks, and more. As a result of sequestration and other austerity measures enacted since 2011, FY14 funding for NDD programs was about 15% below FY10 levels, adjusted for inflation. Unless Congress takes action to end sequestration, funding levels will decline even further and will be equal to their lowest level in at least 50 years.

HOW YOU CAN TAKE ACTION

Congress needs to hear from you! Join advocates from many sectors around the country by signing a letter urging lawmakers to replace sequestration with a balanced approach to deficit reduction.

Sign your organization on to the letter.
Sign on at http://nlihc.org/takeaction/ndd2106
View the letter at http://bit.ly/1wXaLG4
Share the letter and encourage organizations in your network to sign.
Sign your organization on to the letter by COB on Monday, January 5.

Questions or comments, please email outreach@nlihc.org.

nlihccalltoaction

 



Affordable Rental Housing Still Elusive For Extremely Low-Income Vermonters

Posted August 27, 2014

A new report published in the National Low Income Housing Coalition‘s Housing Spotlight shows just how difficult it is for Vermont’s lowest income renters to find housing that is affordable to them in the current rental market. The report, Housing Spotlight: The Affordable Rental Housing Gap Persists, shows that there were just 39 rental homes affordable and available for every 100 extremely low income households in Vermont in 2012, the last year for which data was available. Extremely low income households have incomes at or below 30% of area median income (approximately $21,000 a year). Statewide, there is a need for 9,203 more rental homes to close the affordable rental housing gap for extremely low-income renters.

With such a limited supply of affordable rental homes available to Vermonters, 63% of extremely low-income renters end up spending more than half of their limited income on rent and utility costs.

For the first time, this edition of Housing Spotlight also highlights how it is nearly impossible for Vermonters with incomes at or below 15% of area median income to find housing that they can afford. These renters are considered deeply low-income and are most often elderly or disabled households living on fixed incomes, such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI). There were just 11 affordable and available apartments for every 100 Vermont renter households in this income group, and 82% of these renters spent more than half of their income on housing costs.  The graphic below shows how those with deeply low-income are affected in each state of the U.S., with no state having more than 34 homes that are affordable and available for these renters.

DLIHousingSpotlight

It has always been difficult for lower income households to find affordable homes, and today it is harder than ever because renting has become an increasingly common choice among higher income households since the housing crisis. Nationally, the number of renters with income greater than 120% of area median income increased by 1.2 million between 2009 and 2012, transforming the rental market by putting upward pressure on rents.

In a joint press release sent out this morning, VAHC coordinator Erhard Mahnke stated:

“Given the numbers in this report, it is no wonder we have a serious and growing problem with homelessness in Vermont. If we truly want to prevent, and even end homelessness, we need to get serious about addressing the huge gap between our need for affordable housing and what’s available and affordable to Vermont’s lowest income, most vulnerable households.”

This is a problem that can be solved through greater public investment in our stock of affordable housing at both the federal and state levels. By funding the National Housing Trust Fund (NHTF), Vermont would receive at least $3 million a year, which would stimulate the production of new affordable homes for Vermont’s lowest income residents and create quality jobs in the construction industry. By fully funding the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board (VHCB), the state would further increase its investments in much needed new housing and the Vermont economy, while helping to offset the federal cutbacks of the last several years.

The National Low Income Housing Coalition is dedicated solely to achieving socially just public policy that assures people with the lowest incomes in the United States have affordable and decent homes. For more information on the National Low Income Housing Coalition, visit their website here.

 



Last Day to Register Online for NLIHC’s 2014 Housing Policy Conference

Posted April 21, 2014

Today is the last day to register online for NLIHC’s Housing Policy Conference and Lobby Day. Regular registration closes today, April 21, at 11:59 pm EDT.

Advocates, providers, residents, and policy professionals from across the country will come together at NLIHC’s Annual Housing Policy Conference next week. To mark NLIHC’s 40th anniversary, the conference will spend time looking back at the past 40 years of low income housing, and on moving forward with solving the housing challenges of the lowest income Americans. The conference will culminate with a Lobby Day where attendees will head to the Hill to take action and tell their legislators what their communities need.

Register online today!  More about the conference here.

 



Governor’s Council on Pathways From Poverty Featured by NLIHC

Posted April 17, 2014

The Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition played an early role in the development and formation of the Governor’s Council on Pathways from Poverty.  The National Low Income Housing Coalition recently profiled the Council:                                                ___________________________________________________

When the 2014 Vermont State Legislative Session opened in January, advocates were pleased that Governor Peter Shumlin (D) was committed to addressing growing poverty in their state. After hearing from a diverse group of advocates, Governor Shumlin released an anti-poverty initiative in December 2013 that would sufficiently fund housing and safety net programs and increase their efficiency. The initiative also created the Governor’s Council on Pathways from Poverty to determine the nature and primary causes of poverty in the state, to review the extent to which public and private agencies are addressing poverty, and to make recommendations to local, state and federal governments, non-profit agencies, charities, and other businesses on actions that should be taken to respond to the crisis.  Erhard Mahnke, coordinator for the Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition (VAHC), an NLIHC State Coalition Partner, was appointed to the council and chairs the subcommittee on housing and homelessness.

In mid-2013, housing, homelessness, domestic violence, legal aid and other advocates, met with the Shumlin Administration to express concern about shrinking federal resources and limited state funds, which have exacerbated homelessness and poverty in the state. Vermont is struggling with record homelessness as shelters reached capacity and the cost of motels and hotels to house people without shelter soared (see Memo9/6/13). Advocates were also concerned with the administration’s plan to cut the state’s Earned Income Tax Credit program, and to put hard time limits on participants in Reach Up, the state welfare to work program.

In September 2013, at Governor Shumlin’s request, advocates submitted recommended actions the administration should take immediately to help people with difficult living conditions. Among their top-tier priorities included were targeted, strategic increases for key public benefit programs including the state’s federal food assistance program (3Squares VT), General Assistance, Reach Up, mental health rental assistance vouchers, and full funding for the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board, the entity that administers the state’s housing and conservation trust fund. Increased state funding for rental assistance, the Emergency Solutions Grant Program, childcare financial assistance, and job creation programs were suggested to further reduce poverty in the state. They also recommended regulatory and operational changes at the Vermont Agency of Human Services to help these programs work more effectively. Advocates also suggested that the Governor establish an advisory council on ending poverty to make further, long term recommendations to him and to work with his administration on their implementation.

Advocates were heartened by the Governor’s swift response to their concerns. The majority of their budgetary recommendations, mainly those pertaining to housing, homelessness, and childcare, made it into his FY15 budget as a part of his plan to address the poverty crisis. “At their best, our anti-poverty and housing programs make sure that all Vermonters have food and shelter, as well as the help, education and training to find good jobs,” said Governor Shumlin in a press release that outlined the proposals he embraced. “All of us need help in different ways and at different times in our lives. Together we will make sure the programs we support for these efforts are successful and productive.”

The Governor’s Council on Pathways from Poverty, created by executive order the same day the proposals were released, is made up of advocates from the broad spectrum of human services, including housing, homeless services (including formerly homeless persons), healthcare, corrections, private sector developers, domestic violence, women’s concerns, and child and family services. In his new leadership role, Mr. Mahnke will work to keep the council and state administration informed of affordable housing concerns and strategies that should be employed. In addition, Mr. Mahnke is working with advocates in the VAHC network to urge state legislators to adopt Governor Shumlin’s proposed budget. The Vermont House has already included funding for most housing and homelessness programs at the governor’s requested levels. The session is expected to adjourn in May.

“Governor Shumlin has been very supportive of affordable housing and homelessness, so the initiatives we fought against last year came as an unpleasant surprise and brought a major outcry of opposition from low income and housing advocates,” said Mr. Mahnke. “We’ve been extremely heartened by the Governor’s willingness to open lines of communication over the last nine months, embrace many of our recommendations, and create this new forum for dialogue, collaboration and make significant progress in alleviating poverty in Vermont.”

For more information, contact Erhard Mahnke, Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition, at erhardm@vtaffordablehousing.org.

Read the article at NLIHC’s Memo to Members.

 



New Report Finds Vermont Renters Still Cannot Afford the Rent

Posted March 24, 2014

The State’s High Rents are Out of Reach for Working Families

BURLINGTON, VT In order to afford a modest, two-bedroom apartment at the Fair Market Rent in Vermont, renters need to earn $19.36 per hour, or $40,272 a year. This is Vermont’s 2014 Housing Wage, revealed in a report released today. The report, Out of Reach 2014, was jointly released by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, a Washington, DC-based research and advocacy organization, and the Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition.

The Housing Wage is the hourly wage a family must earn, working 40 hours a week, 52 weeks a year, to be able to afford the rent and utilities for a safe and modest home in the private housing market.

An estimated 62% of renters in Vermont do not earn enough to afford a two-bedroom unit at the average statewide Fair Market Rent of $1,007.

Working at the minimum wage in Vermont, a family must have 2.2 wage earners working full-time, or one full-time earner working 89 hours per week at minimum wage, to afford a modest two-bedroom apartment. While it is possible for a household to work more than one job to make ends meet, a 2011 Vermont study showed that 62% of the state’s households had only one, or less than one full time workers.

“Vermont continues to be one of the states with the least affordable rental housing,” said Ted Wimpey, Director of the Fair Housing Project at the Champlain Valley Office of Economic Opportunity and Chair of the Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition.  “It is extremely difficult for even moderate income people in Vermont to find affordable rental housing. The situation has many serious consequences, including increased homelessness and greater numbers of families struggling to get by.”

The typical renter in Vermont earns $11.24 an hour, which is $8.12 less than the hourly wage needed to afford a modest unit.

According to Jeanne Montross, Executive Director of Helping Overcome Poverty’s Effects (HOPE) and Chair of the Vermont Coalition to End Homelessness, “Although there have been some recent, small signs of  economic recovery, wages – especially for those at the bottom of the economic ladder – continue to stagnate. Real income has actually fallen for low income households, while the costs of housing, heat, and food continue to climb. This, in combination with a reduction in the availability of housing subsidies, makes it a given that we will see more and more families become homeless.”

Greater investment in our stock of affordable housing is needed at both the federal and state levels. By funding the National Housing Trust Fund, Vermont would receive at least $3 million a year, which would stimulate the production of new affordable homes for Vermont’s lowest income residents and create quality jobs in the construction industry. By fully funding the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board, the state would further increase its investments in much needed new housing and the Vermont economy, while helping to offset the federal cutbacks of the last several years.

“We can no longer ignore the dire need for affordable housing when three out of every four extremely low income households nationally have to spend more than half of their income on housing costs,” said NLIHC President and CEO Sheila Crowley. “Closing this gap is achievable through the National Housing Trust Fund.”

Additional Facts:

  • The national Housing Wage is $18.92 in 2014
  • Vermont is the 13th most expensive state in the nation for renters
  • Vermont is the ninth most expensive state for non-metropolitan/rural areas
  • The Housing Wage is up 26% since the Great Recession began in 2007
  • The Housing Wage in the greater metropolitan area of Burlington is $25.17, 13% higher than the state average

Every year, Out of Reach provides the Housing Wage and other housing affordability data for every state, metropolitan area, combined non-metropolitan area, and county in the country. For additional information, visit: http://www.nlihc.org/oor/2014.

Find out more about the facts and figures of Vermont’s 2014 Out of Reach report here.

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Take Action: Deadline Approaching to Sign On In Support of HUD Funding

Posted March 11, 2014

Please join the Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition in signing on to the National Low Income Housing Coalition‘s letter in support of increasing the THUD 302(b) allocation!

Deadline to sign on is tomorrow Wednesday, March 12, but the website will remain open for signatures through Thursday the 13th.

Please sign your organization on to the letter today!

Over 1,800 organizations who have already signed a letter in support of increasing the THUD 302(b) allocation!  Some more background from NLIHC:

The House and Senate Committees on Appropriations will soon decide how much funding each appropriations subcommittee will receive in FY15. This funding allocation for subcommittees, called the 302(b), will determine how much funding is available for HUD programs in FY15.

WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT

It is critical that the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies (THUD) Subcommittees in the House and Senate receive 302(b) allocations that are at the highest possible levels. Adequate 302(b) allocations will help ensure that the THUD Subcommittees have the resources they need to fully fund all housing programs.

HOW YOU CAN TAKE ACTION

House and Senate appropriators need to hear from you! Join housing, community development, and transportation advocates around the country by signing a letter urging the highest possible 302(b) allocations.

Last year, over 2,400 organizations signed on in support of increasing the THUD 302(b) allocation. Members of Congress noted the significance of the letter, and it made a positive impact on the amount of funding available for housing and transportation programs. Help make a difference in FY15 by joining this year’s effort!

 

For more information email outreach@nlihc.org with any questions.

 



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