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House and Senate Tax Bills Will Decimate Affordable Housing in Vermont

Posted December 1, 2017

MONTPELIER, VT — The Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition (VAHC), a state leader in housing policy, research and advocacy, today issued the following statement on the tax bill recently passed by the U.S. House of Representatives and under consideration in the Senate:

At a time when Vermont already has a shortage of 10,866 affordable homes for extremely low income renters and the 5th highest affordability gap for renters in the country, the pending tax proposals would eliminate tax credits and financing tools that have helped create thousands of affordable apartments  in our state and made homeownership more affordable for thousands of Vermonters.

“Vermont already has an affordable housing crisis, but these bills would make it a catastrophe.  Without the tax credits and bonds that the House bill eliminates, thousands of affordable homes will not be built, and more Vermonters will be left homeless or stuck in homes they cannot afford,” said Ted Wimpey, VAHC Steering Committee Chair and Director of CVOEO’s Fair Housing Project.  “The Senate proposal is more favorable but would still substantially reduce affordable rental housing production at a time when the need is so acute.  If either of these tax bills becomes law, it will put families out on the streets and irreparably harm Vermont communities.”

Overall, Vermont could lose an estimated $15 million in housing investments every year – losses that not only directly affect Coalition members’ ability to create affordable housing for low-income and vulnerable Vermonters, but also the amount of construction and real estate activity that the state relies on to help stimulate economic development, create good-paying jobs, and improve our communities.

“We are thankful that our entire congressional delegation strongly opposes these unbelievably harmful bills and hope that they do not become law, especially those provisions that are so damaging to affordable housing,” noted VAHC Coordinator Erhard Mahnke.  “We need real tax reform that helps address our housing crisis and protects struggling low- and moderate-income people.”

THE TAX BILL PASSED BY THE HOUSE:

  • Significantly weakens the Low Income Housing Tax Credit, the nation’s largest affordable rental housing development resource. The Housing Credit is a successful public-private partnership that has become the foundation for affordable housing development across Vermont and New England. While the credit itself is retained, it would be significantly weakened due to the proposed reduction in the corporate tax. With the value of depreciation expense and interest deductions reduced, the value of the Housing Credit would drop, greatly reducing private investment in low income housing. The tax proposal contains no changes to the credit that would help address this impact.
    • The Vermont Housing Finance Agency (VHFA) estimates the state would lose $5-6 million in private investments annually as a result. Last year the Housing Credit generated $30 million in private, up-front equity for construction, acquisition and renovation of affordable housing across the state.  In recent years, the credit has helped fund an annual average of 300 rental homes.
  • Eliminates the tax exemption on Private Activity Bonds, including multifamily and homeownership housing bonds. This tax exemption allows bond-financed multifamily projects to access ‘4% Housing Credits,’ which have helped produce or preserve tens of thousands of affordable homes in New England. Developments financed with 4% Credits often serve households with extremely low incomes, and have also been used on mixed-income developments that meet demand for market rate housing.
    • 4% Housing Credits are used with tax-exempt bond financing to fund approximately 1,200 affordable rentals over the last seven years. If this provision becomes law, Vermont could lose another $6-7 million in housing investments every year and see the annual number of rental homes financed potentially cut in half.
    • Tax-exempt Mortgage Revenue Bonds finance almost half of VHFA’s safe, low-cost mortgages to first-time homebuyers and would be eliminated under the House bill.
    • Mortgage Credit Certificates would no longer be available to assist eligible home buyers.
  • Eliminates the Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit, which is a vital tool in the creation and preservation of affordable housing in historic buildings. Historic Tax Credits (HTCs) have had an enormous impact on our communities, attracting developers to invest in vacant, deteriorated, and underutilized structures.  In Vermont, HTCs are primarily used to help fund affordable housing, whether in large old mixed-use buildings in downtowns, or multiple buildings in scattered site developments.  Without them, many new projects would never take place because they wouldn’t be financially feasible.  If HTC’s are eliminated, it will have a devastating impact on our ability to develop affordable housing in the places where it makes the most sense – our downtowns, where low and moderate income Vermonters are close to goods, services and supports and can spend less on transportation.
    • In 2017, $1.8 million in HTCs leveraged $11.8 million in total investments to help fund 65 homes in redeveloped buildings in Bennington, Brattleboro, Burlington, Fair Haven, Montpelier and Stowe.
    • From 2012 – 2017, $24 million in HTCs helped fund 643 homes in 68 projects, serving 25 Vermont communities and generating $145 million in total private investment.
  • Eliminates the New Markets Tax Credit, a key resource for community revitalization efforts in economically distressed areas. Housing and community development investments work together in revitalizing neighborhoods and improving local economies.  Neither investment can do it alone.
    • Housing Vermont’s tax credit program has used over $123 million in financing for 15 projects that invest in the economic, environmental, and social well-being of Vermont communities.
    • The many projects financed include the Enosburg Health Center, the Brooks House and Commonwealth Dairy in Brattleboro, Barre’s City Place, and Burlington’s King Street Youth Center.
  • Reforms the Mortgage Interest Deduction, which has been a long-standing priority for housing advocates and would ordinarily be a major step in the right direction. Unfortunately, instead of using the savings from this reform to better target spending on housing solutions for those with the greatest needs, the House bill funnels these and other savings to pay for highly regressive tax cuts for the richest households and corporations.
  • Increases the federal debt by $1.5 trillion over a decade, a move likely to lead to deep spending cuts to affordable housing and community development, not to mention Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security. Unfunded tax cuts will only add pressure on Congress to enact massive budget cuts at the expense of millions of families who benefit from federal investments that help them meet basic needs.
  • Threatens to dramatically reduce charitable giving, which will have an enormous impact on all nonprofits, including Coalition members who develop affordable housing and provide a broad array of services to low-income Vermonters and those with special needs. According to Urban Institute estimates, Vermonters’ pro-rata loss in charitable gift deductions could be as much as $136 million.  Community organizations like the Committee on Temporary Shelter (COTS), which rely heavily on individual and business contributions, could immediately feel the impact of a tax bill that no longer incentivizes middle income Americans to contribute locally.

THE SENATE TAX PROPOSAL:

  • Is more favorable to affordable housing than the House bill, because it preserves Private Activity Bonds, retains both the New Market and Historic Preservation Tax Credits, and adds a number of no-cost enhancements to the Low Income Housing Tax Credit. Nonetheless, its impact on the equity raised by the Housing Credit is the same as the House bill, so it would still severely reduce affordable rental housing production at a time when Vermont and most of the nation continue to be gripped by an acute affordable housing crisis.  National tax experts Novogradac & Co. estimate that, over ten years, the Senate tax bill – which is still undergoing changes – would reduce the future supply of affordable rental housing by nearly 300,000 homes nationally and that Vermont could lose:
    • 650 rental homes,
    • 740 jobs,
    • $62,089,000 in business income, and
    • $23,881,000 million in federal, state and local taxes. 

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The Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition is a statewide membership organization dedicated to ensuring that all Vermonters have decent, safe and affordable housing, particularly the state’s low and moderate-income residents, elders, people living with homelessness, and people with disabilities.
For more information, visit www.vtaffordablehousing.org.

 

 



Housing Vermont Scholarship Fund

Posted February 11, 2016

Residents of housing affiliated with Housing Vermont are eligible for an annual scholarship of up to $2,500. Scholarships are available for both degreed and non‐degreed programs as well as for those interested in taking classes which lead to certifications.

The funds can be used for tuition, materials & books, childcare, transportation, or other expenses related to enrolling in a program.
Scholarships for the 2016‐2017 school year will be announced in late spring 2016.

For a list of eligible housing sites, please visit the Housing Vermont web site at http://www.hvt.org/about-us/scholarships/.

For more information on the application process, please visit the VSAC (Vermont Student Assistance Corporation) web site at www.vsac.org.

To view and download an informational flyer, click here.

 



Affordable Housing Development Opens In Woodstock

Posted September 23, 2015

Yesterday Woodstock, Vermont’s first affordable housing development officially opened. Safford Commons consists of 28 energy-efficient rental apartments at the site of the former Grange Hall and church. Valley News reported last week on how it took less than 10 days to fill every unit in the complex, which now has a waiting list with more than 40 names on it. Read more about Safford Commons and the ribbon cutting celebration below in this article from VPR:

The first affordable housing project for the affluent Upper Valley town of Woodstock was officially opened Tuesday. The Safford Commons project has been a long time coming in an area where demand is high.

The 28 energy-efficient apartments are clustered in multi-colored cottage-like dwellings on the site of a former Grange Hall not far from Woodstock High School. Abutters to the land fought the project for over a decade, saying that duplexes and triplexes would mar the natural setting. But they lost their court battle.

“There’s nothing to fight, and there’s nothing to fear, because in Vermont we do it right,” said Gov. Peter Shumlin before triumphantly cutting a shiny ribbon strung across one of the front porches.

Funding for the $9.5 million complex came from a patchwork of public and private sources, including the Woodstock Community Trust. President Patsy Highberg said persistence and multiple partnerships have paid dividends for tenants now living affordably in an area where the cost of living is high.

“The length of our battle makes these homes around us even more unbelievable as we stand here today to welcome new and current residents to our community,” Highberg told the audience gathered under a tent.

Rents range from $600 for a subsidized 1-bedroom unit to $1,000 for a two-bedroom apartment at market price. Donna Crawford happily moved here from New Jersey with her mother after her father died. He had once been a businessman in Springfield, Vermont.

“He died in August so we decided to move back up home, bring mom back home. And … yes, she lives with me, she’s 88,” Crawford said, smiling.

The entire housing complex was fully rented in about 10 days. Andrew Winter, director of Twin Pines Housing Trust, which manages the property, says housing demand still outstrips supply.

“And unfortunately the bad news is that we’ve got a really long wait list of over 40 families that are trying to get in here that won’t be able to,” said Winter.

Eventually Safford Commons hopes to add four more units. Meanwhile, Winter says, Twin Pines is expanding affordable housing in other locations, including Hartford. The rental vacancy rate in the Upper Valley is very low, between 1 and 2 percent.

For the full article, including audio, click here. For further coverage of this event view Vermont Business Magazine‘s article here.

 



New Affordable Housing Co-op Underway in Burlington

Posted August 28, 2015

groundbreaking smaller

Photo credit: Kenn Sassorossi

Thursday morning brought together scores of interested onlookers as two local nonprofit housing developers were joined by Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger and Vermont’s Speaker of the House Shap Smith to mark the beginning of construction of a new housing co-op in Burlington’s Old North End.

“The Bright Street Housing Cooperative will create greatly-needed new affordable housing opportunities in Burlington, and will continue the recent progress of substantial new investment in the Old North End,” said Mayor Miro Weinberger. “Congratulations and thank you to the Champlain Housing Trust and Housing Vermont for the creative, dedicated work that has made today’s groundbreaking possible and for your partnership in the long-term effort to make Burlington more affordable.”

“We know that community centers and downtowns are what many young families seek out as they search for places to work and grow a home. The Bright Street Housing Cooperative provides housing opportunity in this neighborhood in a way that reflects local needs and values. It was created with community involvement. When complete, it will offer housing that people need and can afford,” added Vermont Speaker of the House Shap Smith.

Two nonprofits – Champlain Housing Trust and Housing Vermont – are collaborating to build the development that will create 40 new homes on the one and a quarter acre brownfield site. Construction is underway and occupancy is expected in September, 2016. Four old, blighted buildings are to be removed to make way for the new housing in three buildings. Land is set aside for the possibility of installing a community garden at a later date.

“We are excited to be here in the Old North End creating new affordable apartments for the first time in more than a decade,” said Brenda Torpy, CEO of the Champlain Housing Trust. “We’re also thrilled to be organizing this development as a co-op giving the residents some of the benefits of ownership – as the neighborhood requested – while imparting leadership and business skills to the people who move in.”

Funding for the housing came from a variety of sources, including investments made by TD Bank through the federal Low Income Housing Tax Credit program. Grants from HUD-funded programs were instrumental to the development, including support from NeighborWorks® America, HOME and Community Development Block Grants (commonly known as CDBG), the latter administered by the City of Burlington. Support and financing also came from the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board, Vermont Housing Finance Agency, Burlington Electric Department, Vermont Gas, the City of Burlington’s Housing Trust Fund, TD Charitable Foundation, and the Southern Windsor County Regional Planning Commission.

In addition, the Chittenden County Regional Planning Commission and State of Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation early support allowed the developers to hire professional expertise to conduct Environmental Site Assessments and Archeological Resource Assessments of the property, facilitating the redevelopment.

“While this project will bring long lasting housing and community development benefits to residents, the neighborhood and the broader community, it also generates significant economic advantages,” said Housing Vermont President Nancy Owens. “It will create 118 on-site jobs and 177 off-site jobs while providing more than $25 million in construction and indirect economic benefit.”

D.E.W. Construction out of Williston is the general contractor for the development and Duncan Wisniewski Architecture is the project’s architect. The cost of the development, including the environmental clean-up of the site, is approximately $11.7 million.

The housing will include a range of bedroom sizes to house both individuals and families. While not firm yet, rents for the two-bedroom expect to range between $775 and $1,200 a month, heat and hot water included. Fair Market Rent, as determined by HUD, is $1,328 for a two-bedroom apartment.

“We receive over 150 applications a month from people looking for an affordable rental, and we’ll only have a handful available,” explained CHT’s Torpy. “Building new housing like this is so critical for people in Burlington and surrounding communities.”

For more coverage of this story view the articles linked below:
Nonprofits Break Ground on Bright St. Co-op (Burlington Free Press)
City Celebrates New Option For Low-Cost Living (WPTZ)

 



Mixed Use Redevelopment of Brattleboro Site Wins HUD Design Award

Posted June 23, 2015

The Canal & Main Apartments/Brattleboro Food Cooperative development was one of two projects to receive the 2015 HUD Secretary’s Housing and Community Design Award for excellence in affordable housing design.

HUD and the American Institute of Architects (AIA) selected Step Up on 5th in Santa Monica, California; and Brattleboro’s Canal & Main development as national affordable housing models.

“Affordable housing represents a gateway to greater opportunity. These two projects are a powerful reminder that bold vision and innovative design can shape communities of promise,” said HUD Secretary Julián Castro. “I congratulate these winners on their achievements and I’m proud to honor them for their commitment to inclusive development.”

The Brattleboro Food Co-op, Windham & Windsor Housing Trust and Housing Vermont partnered to redevelop a site in downtown Brattleboro. The scope of the project included the demolition of the obsolete Brattleboro Food Co-op building and the construction of a four-story, highly energy-efficient, green building. The attractive new building provides 33,600 square feet of retail and office space for the Co-op on the first two floors and 24 affordable apartments in the top two floors.

Gossens Bachman Architects designed the innovative building. The award recognized the “building is a model of energy efficiency, using both conventional and innovative systems, such as heating the entire building with reclaimed waste heat from the store refrigeration system. The collaborative design process was a critical factor in making the project a model for responsible building practice and smart growth.”

The site, previously contaminated by a dry cleaning facility, was cleaned up. The building was moved away from the nearby brook to protect the water from pollution and the building from flooding. Storm water runoff is treated and filtered by a green roof, permeable surfaces in the parking lot, and a 20-foot buffer strip in the new public park created along the Whetstone Brook. Recycled heat generated by the Co-op’s refrigerators heats the store and the apartments and provides hot water.

Construction materials included locally harvested and milled flooring and slate siding manufactured in Vermont. The apartments have continuous fresh air ventilation with heat recovery and the Co-op uses a solar photovoltaic system to generate electricity. These features have cut per-square-foot energy costs by approximately 50 percent, which helps keep the apartments affordable and saves 21 tons of CO2 emissions a year.

 



Colchester Receives $500K Grant For Affordable Housing

Posted May 5, 2015

Yesterday, Governor Peter Shumlin presented Champlain Housing Trust and Housing Vermont with a $500,000 Community Development Block Grant to help keep the housing at Colchester’s Winchester Place affordable and updated. Below is a report from WCAX:

The State of Vermont is investing in affordable housing for Colchester.

Gov. Peter Shumlin presented the Champlain Housing Trust and Housing Vermont with a half-million dollar grant Monday morning. The Community Development Block Grant will keep the 166 Winchester Place units affordable, pay for energy efficiency upgrades, and creation of a playground.

The Governor says the project is a smart investment. “Let’s make it more energy efficient. let’s take out the old doors and windows — fill them with insulation. Let’s modernize the units and let’s keep this affordable for jobs, for quality of life, and for the kids that are going to grow up here and have a great future,” Shumlin said.

“Partnership is how we get things done in Vermont and I’m pleased that we can help in this. It’s a win, win, win. It’s community development, it’s affordable housing, and it’s a good investment for the treasurer’s office,” said Treasurer Beth Pearce, D-Vermont.

The Governor says the project will provide work for 200 people. Town funds will pay for new LED lights for the neighborhood.

Additional coverage can be found here:
Affordable Housing Grant Also Puts Vermonters to Work (Local 22 (WVNY) & Local 44 (WFFF))
State Grant of $500,000 Will Make Affordable Housing More Energy Efficient (VermontBiz.com)

 



Governor Shumlin Announces $500,000 for Affordable Housing in Colchester

Posted May 4, 2015

Standing in the heart of a Colchester neighborhood, Gov. Peter Shumlin announced a $500,000 Vermont Community Development Program grant to lock in the affordability of eighty homes and make them more energy efficient. The apartments are part of Winchester Place, a mixed-income development of 166 apartments owned in partnership by the Champlain Housing Trust and Housing Vermont. The long term affordability of the homes will secured through the purchase of the land which has been leased from St. Michael’s College.

“Keeping these apartments affordable is a priority for us, and it’s a Vermont-style, common-sense approach to preserve what we have,” said Gov. Shumlin. “We can invest in energy efficiency and extend the affordability of these apartments much cheaper than we could ever replace them. At the same time, this redevelopment will put Vermonters to work.”

Joining the Governor for the announcement was Vermont Treasurer Beth Pearce, who said, “”Winchester Place is a great example of getting work done the Vermont way. Working together we can make real progress in accomplishing the affordable housing needs of Vermont. As a VHFA Board member I have seen firsthand the exceptional work of Champlain Housing Trust and Housing Vermont.”

The grant was awarded to the Town of Colchester to help fund the work at the property, which will include air sealing, adding insulation, replacing leaky windows and obsolete appliances, and other energy efficiency upgrades; improved storm water management and other site work; and creation of a playground and improved basketball court for the nearly 150 children living at the property.

“Because of the support of the State of Vermont, the Town of Colchester and all of the numerous other partners and funders on this effort, the families at Winchester Place will be able to continue to call Colchester home,’” said Nadine Scibek, chair of the Colchester Selectboard. “It is so important for our community to keep this housing affordable.”

The redevelopment has also been assisted by the state with more than $1 million from the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board. These funds are leveraging other sources to complete the project including the HOME program, state and federal tax credits, and NeighborWorks America. The Town of Colchester is also contributing additional funding to install LED lighting on site, which will cut energy use in half. Lastly, the Ronald McDonald House Charities in Burlington made a contribution to help fund the playground.

“Not only will this project mean that we can preserve and improve affordable housing in a very tight rental market, but it also provides more than 200 jobs in the construction trades and related industries,” said Kathy Beyer, Housing Vermont’s Vice President of Development.

“Winchester Place is a critical piece of CHT’s affordable housing in Chittenden County, and we’re looking forward to its next chapter,” added Brenda Torpy, CEO of the Champlain Housing Trust. “There’s such a need for housing in our region and across the state. Preserving Winchester ensures we’re not slipping backwards.”

The Vermont Community Development Program is administered by the Department of Housing and Community Development using funding from the federal Community Development Block Grant Program of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The program helps Vermonters and their communities by developing affordable housing, creating jobs, public facilities and public services. U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy, Senator Bernie Sanders and Congressman Peter Welch play a key role by supporting the program in Washington, D.C.

 



Vermont Rural Ventures’ Project Selected as Semi-Finalist for National Award

Posted May 1, 2015

Vermont Rural Ventures’ innovative financing of the redevelopment of Brattleboro’s Brooks House has been chosen as a semi-finalist by the National Development Council (NDC) for its Academy 2015 Awards. The awards recognize the top economic and community development projects in the nation and are part of the NDC Academy 2015 biennial conference.

Vermont Rural Ventures, the community development subsidiary of Housing Vermont, partnered with the Massachusetts Housing Investment Corporation, to provide $23.4 million in New Markets Tax Credit authority to redevelop and restore the historic circa 1871 Brooks House, a mixed-use commercial building located in the heart of Brattleboro’s downtown.

“The Brooks House block occupies a prominent place in downtown Brattleboro,” said Hildene President and NDC Board Member Seth Bongartz. “Redeveloping that property was crucial for the area, and I am incredibly proud to see Vermont being recognized for innovation and community strength on the national stage.”

Completed in the fall 2014, the Brooks House includes classrooms for the Vermont Technical College and the Community College of Vermont, retail shops, three restaurants and 23 mixed-income apartments.

The Historic Brooks House Redevelopment Project was selected by NDC as a semi-finalist in the Community Development category. One project in each category will be awarded the top honor at the NDC Academy 2015 Awards on May 14. To learn more about the Brooks House Project, visit: http://vermontruralventures.com/vrv-projects/brooks-house-brattleboro/.

 



Champlain Housing Trust Event in Colchester with Governor Shumlin on Monday, May 4th

Posted April 30, 2015

This coming Monday, May 4 at 10am Governor Shumlin will be joining Champlain Housing Trust and Housing Vermont to announce state and federal grant awards for our efforts to preserve the affordability and invest in energy efficiency at Winchester Place in Colchester.

What: Announcement of grant awards for Winchester Place, a 166-apartment development in Colchester

When: Monday, May 4 at 10am

Where: Winchester Place, 7 Douglas Drive, Colchester (between the Vermont National Guard and Fort Ethan Allen on Route 15, take Barnes Avenue to Hegeman, then left onto Douglas)

About Winchester Place and the redevelopment:

Built in 1989, Winchester Place’s 166 apartments are a significant piece of Chittenden County’s affordable housing stock. The property is conveniently located on Route 15 and rarely has any vacancies. Almost all of the apartments have two bedrooms, with just a handful of three bedroom apartments. The average rent at the property is $1,050; Fair Market Rent for Chittenden County is $1,328. There are no vacancies among the 166 apartments.

The work to be undertaken will secure the affordability of Winchester Place’s apartments for the long-term as a resource for the community. In all, approximately $14 million will be invested into the property, including purchasing the land from St. Michael’s College, investing in energy efficiency measures such as new windows, air sealing and insulation, conducting site work, and improving storm water systems. The work will begin in the summer of 2015. Funding has come from the Vermont Community Development Program, Vermont Housing and Conservation Board, State and Federal housing tax credits, the Town of Colchester, the federal HOME program, NeighborWorks® America with construction and permanent financing from the Vermont Housing Finance Agency. The Ronald McDonald House Charities in Burlington recently awarded a $3,000 grant to help install a playground.

CHT

 



Hinesburg Wins $675,000 Housing Grant

Posted March 18, 2015

Hinesburg is one of several communities that was recently awarded a Community Development Block Grant from the Vermont Community Development Program. Read how Champlain Housing Trust, Housing Vermont, and Snyder Homes plan on using these funds to build 23 new affordable housing units in this article from the Burlington Free Press:

Hinesburg recently was awarded a grant of $675,000 under the Vermont Community Development Program, for the purpose of helping to fund affordable housing in the Green Street project.

The grant, announced last week by Gov. Shumlin and Patricia Moulton, secretary of the Agency of Commerce and Community Development, was the second largest among those awarded to 13 Vermont towns and cities, for a total of $4,287,000. The other grants, from $19,830 to $850,000, are expected to fund accessibility, disaster recovery and housing.

The Green Street development will be built south of the southwest corner of Vermont 116 and Charlotte Road, along a newly constructed road. It received approval from the town Development Review Board in October for 23 units in townhouse-style homes including two one-story accessible apartments.

A 2010 housing assessment for the Hinesburg Affordable Housing Committee reported a strong need for more rental access in Hinesburg for people earning less than 60 percent of the average median income.

Chris Snyder of Snyder Homes, builder of the project, said the company plans to start construction about May 15.

A sidewalk will connect the units with Vermont 116 for access to the community school and other amenities in the village.

About eight acres of open space west of the built area will be available for agricultural use and a 100-foot buffer for the LaPlatte River.

An earlier different application for the area had received water allocation from the town; the State of Vermont will issue a revised water permit, Snyder said. It would be in effect when the town’s new wells are online.

Community Development Program grants must go to municipalities, which then lend the funds to the prospective owners — in this case Champlain Housing Trust and Housing Vermont.

Amy Demetrowitz of Champlain Housing Trust said, “We had a very good relationship with Snyder on a successful project in Williston. We are happy to partner with Snyder Homes on a turnkey project.”

For a link to the full article, click here.

 



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